Sermons by Rev. Lyn Cox

Weaving Hope (4.14.2019)

Some years ago, at an all-ages UU retreat, I was introduced to the spiritual practice of basket weaving. I thought it would be an easy break in between the workshop on Paul’s letters and our hike in the woods. People from age eight to eighty sat around the table with various kinds of ribbon, natural and artificial reeds, and coils of rush…

Stardust (4.7.2019)

The story of the universe’s origins fill me with awe and wonder. How about you? In particular today, the scientific story of the universe leads me to reflect on time and change, awe and wonder. In this morning’s story, we talked about what happened between the first few seconds of the universe to eight and a half billion years later with the…

In motion (3.31.2019)

Unitarian Universalism is an active faith. It requires something of every participant. We come together to care for each other and the world. Describing a congregation or the Unitarian Universalist movement as a whole can be difficult, because we don’t have a rock-solid, unchangeable creed. It’s a different way of thinking of religion than many people are accustomed to. What draws us…

Balance (3.17.2019)

The Spring Equinox is the time when daylight and darkness are balanced, right on the edge between winter and spring. It is a good time of year to think about other kinds of balance in our lives. There are at least three ways I can think of to maintain balance. I can demonstrate the first…

This Freedom Commands (2.24.2019)

Unitarian Universalists often try to explain ourselves through history. Sometimes we say that we are a religion of deeds, not creeds, and so it falls to us to explain what kinds of deeds we’re talking about that demonstrate the power and possibility of our faith. We tell the stories of prophetic people of all genders…

The Wisdom of Love (2.16.2019)

There is an annual occurrence that seems to have lasted through this weekend: leftover Valentine’s chocolate is still on sale. I hope this turn of events brings comfort and joy to many. I do wonder, though, if there ought to be more to this season of commitment than a box of candy. Love is wild,…

We Know Within (2.10.2019)

I don’t know if the story happened exactly this way, but I believe it’s true. There was a married couple, Avram and Sarai, near the city of Ur in ancient Babylonia. They led a comfortable life, with a large household. A holy voice spoke to Sarai and Avram, saying “Lech lecha,” which means, “go to…

stained glass window of chalisse

We Yet Shall Be (1.27.2019)

There is a story in the Jewish Talmud about planting trees. A sage is walking along the road and sees someone planting a carob tree. The sage asks the person, “How long will it take for this tree to bear fruit?” “Seventy years,” replies the gardener. The sage then asks: “Are you so healthy a…

Resolve (1.6.2019)

This homily was preached on January 6, 2019, as part of the multigenerational Fire Celebration service to mark the new year. Happy new year! Let us rejoice and be glad in this day, this moment, this year of promise. Let us marvel at a sky full of stars at night and of one particular star…

Winter Solstice (12.23.2018)

The moment of the Winter Solstice is rich in direct experience, mythic stories, and layers of meaning and tradition. Of all of the gifts we can receive by observing the Winter Solstice, there are three in particular that are calling out to me this year: Reflection, Resilience, and Rejoicing.