Worship Online During the Coronavirus Outbreak

Worship has moved online through at least the end of May in an effort to protect our most vulnerable loved ones from exposure to the COVID-19 virus. Join us on YouTube on Sunday morning for livestreamed worship,  and on Facebook and Zoom for on-line connection throughout the week. Join our email list for updates and links each week; send a request to administrator@uucss.org to be added. 

Click here for information about upcoming Sunday morning services.

Look below to learn about and listen to some of our past sermons.

All Are Invited to the Table

Preston Mears grew up in the Episcopal Church, attended a Quaker school, Haverford College and then seminary at the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, MA.  He and Laurie, a life long Unitarian, have 3 children and 7 grandchildren.  They have been members of the UUCSS now for 4 years along with their daughter Rachel and her family.  Preston was ordained in 1966 in the Episcopal Church and served in parish work for 8 years before transitioning to social welfare work. He worked on the federal Food Stamp Program (now called SNAP) from 1974 to 1984 as a welfare office supervisor with the New Hampshire Department of Welfare.  He transferred to the USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service and served as a field supervisor and then as a senior program analyst until retirement in 2010.  He continues to be active in the field through his involvement in the Prince George’s Food Equity Council.

Re-examining Delilah: Survivor, Entrepreneur, Patriot, Hero – What African American Biblical Interpretation Offers UUs

The modern field of African American Biblical Interpretation approaches Jewish and Christian scriptures through the lens of the interpreter’s experience, rather than the author’s presumed mindset.  This approach avoids Eurocentric and patriarchal tendencies and liberates scripture from being anchored in time.  Delilah’s story exemplifies how dominant scriptural interpreters have marginalized and degraded women and cultural “others,” and how a fresh examination can reveal their heroism and courage.  The still-developing African American interpretive enterprise offers itself as a model for rehabilitating our Fourth UU Source to address injustice today.

Bob Clegg is a UU seminarian at Wesley Theological Seminary and is working on a Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Studies at American University.  Next year he plans to open Justice Jobs, a nonprofit jobs office in Baltimore or Frederick, serving people who are reentering the workforce from incarceration, addiction, and chronic unemployment.  Bob is a member of the UU Congregation of Frederick, MD, and he lives with his wife Connie in New Market, MD, with their three cats.

Shinto: The Way of the Gods

How does ritual connect us to the sacred?  Our new Director of Religious Education Catherine Boyle discussed her time spent at Tsubaki Grand Shrine in Japan and the power and meaning of ritual within Shinto.

Love in the Shadow of War

Veronika Martin spoke about her work in conflict zones in Asia and Africa, how her family history guided her there, and what she learned from the human connections made during these difficult times.

Love Your Enemies

When Catherine Buckler initially offered to do this, she had planned to talk about her experiences at the last two Revolutionary Love conferences.  However, after viewing three videos related to the NRA ad campaign controversy, she decided to focus in on one of the ideas explored at the conferences – loving one’s enemies.  See what…